Having a Project Mindset

Young Boy Works on Project

Watching a rerun of Good Life Project with Jonathan Fields and Seth Godin, I was drawn to my favorite scene (around the 16:00 mark, for about three minutes). In it, the discussion centers around how Seth launched Domino Project, and just as it was drawing in more and more people — Poof — and the project was shelved.

A comparison is made with movies and actors: In most cases, an actor finishes a movie and moves ahead on to the next role. A different project within a body of work.

As I talk with small business, especially those in smaller towns and rural places, there tends to be a favoritism towards longevity.

Understandable since a lot of these folks are operating an heirloom business – either handed down to them or something they are transitioning to their children.

With the rapid movement and speed of change around new business practices that include things like social media, mobile payments, and channels of advertising – it’s not surprising how smaller business owners take a short view on things that might not last long. Again, they are used to building towards longevity.

Building with a Project Mindset

During certain times of year, whether it’s a holiday or a season such as back-to-school, we have seasonal “projects” – we gear up, prepare our inventory and advertising, change the look of the store, and then … Poof. Project over. Next.

Pop-up stores can be like projects. Let’s see if or how something works, and pivot where or when it’s appropriate. Kids do it. Architects do it. Even the birds building nests in trees do it.

With a lot of our SmallBizTracks, especially around social media, I explain this project mindset. Let’s immerse ourselves while we’re doing the track / project. If or when a change takes place, we’re in a position to pivot. We knew going in, the track was a project.

Overseeing Bigger Projects Campaign