Write with Your Reader in Mind: Earn Their Attention

“Content may rule, but your online content must be the right sort of content: Customer-focused. Authentic. Compelling. Entertaining. Surprising. Valuable. Interesting. In other words, you must earn the attention of people.”

Content Rules by Ann Handley & C.C. Chapman (emphasis mine)

You know that person who never ever stops talking about themselves? Or the one who always has something nice to say – right before they tell what their agenda really is? That’s probably not you.

When you and I are engaged in a conversation, there’s plenty of give-and-take. You’re a wonderfully empathetic listener offline. You share ideas that build my ideas into better ideas. You’re humble. You’re modest. I enjoy talking with you.

But when you write a blog post … it’s as if someone else has taken over your brain.

You write about you a lot. And how this idea or that plan will help your business. Dropping names and promoting specials is great now and then (70-20-10), but as your blog coach, let me share this tip:

Write with your Reader in Mind

Read from the other side of the computer for a minute and ask yourself three questions  (as the reader, not the writer):

  1. Would I finish reading this post?
  2. Would I share this post?
  3. What would I remember about this post?

Use the quote above from Content Rules as a guideline: Customer-focused. Authentic. Compelling. Entertaining. Surprising. Valuable. Interesting.

Write with your Reader in Mind. Earn Their Attention

Comments

  1. says

    The main purpose of any writer is to attain the attention of his reader. You write anything because you want others to read and understand your points.  So, before writing you should keep your readers in your mind, this will surely help you to write according to your reader’s mind set.

  2. Gary Doyle says

    So much of what we see today is about the writer showing what they know or how well they write — Readers don’t care–they want to read what they want to read–Great thoughts!

  3. Gary Doyle says

    So much of what we see today is about the writer showing what they know or how well they write — Readers don’t care–they want to read what they want to read–Great thoughts!